Companies in the News: Updates from Case, Stay Green and Arborjet

October 8, 2019 -  By
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Debris clearing efforts in Colorado were made easier with Case equipment. (Photo: Case Construction Equipment)

Debris clearing efforts in La Plata County, Colo., were made easier with Case equipment. (Photo: Case Construction Equipment)

Case Construction Equipment dealer Century Equipment donated use of a Case TV380 compact track loader and CX26C mini excavator to Team Rubicon for debris clearing in La Plata County, Colo.

The Team Rubicon effort, which saw the Case equipment move debris including large rocks, earth and parts of 66 trees, was in response to heavy flooding and landslides in 2018 following the 416 wildfires that burned 55,000 acres in southwest Colorado.

“Having the heavy equipment from Centrury Equipment made the heavy lifting of this operation possible,” said Nathan Deneault of Team Rubicon. “Given the environmental impacts of the 2018 wildfires and flooding, it was important to get debris cleared and make a positive impact on the homes that were effected.”

Century Equipment’s donation directly led to more than $40,000 of work being conducted over the three-day effort. In total, 39 Team Rubicon members contributed to the effort. The Case TV380 and CX26C were used to move significant amounts of debris in tight areas that would have been impossible to clear by hand due to ground compaction.

Stay Green in Santa Clarita, Calif., earned three awards for landscaping excellence from the National Association of Landscape Professionals (NALP), which recognizes the nation’s best landscaping projects through its annual Awards of Excellence program.

“These awards go to our team members who bring dedication and professionalism to every project,” said Stay Green CEO Chris Angelo. “Making each property look its best with healthy, sustainable landscaping is always our objective. The NALP awards recognize that we are achieving this goal.”

Stay Green is being honored with NALP Bronze Awards for landscaping excellence at three commercial and residential housing projects in Santa Clarita and throughout Southern California: The Sorrento at Porter Ranch Community Association, a community of 653 single-family homes nestled in the hills of the northwest San Fernando Valley; University Village Thousand Oaks, a picturesque 65-acre retirement community; and Santa Fe Homeowners Association, a condominium community that offers lush, attractive landscaping.

The NALP Awards of Excellence ceremony recognizes superior projects in the areas of landscaping, lawn care and interior maintenance, design/build, installation, container plantings and erosion control. Projects range in size and scope. Awards are presented to lawn and landscape companies across the nation. The Awards of Excellence judging criteria include overall appearance, degree of difficulty, appearance of turf, appearance of trees, appearance of annual color, appearance of shrubs and appearance of ground cover.

The NALP awards will be officially presented in October during the Landscapes 2019 expo and conference in Louisville, Ky.

Arborjet will be treating the oldest tree in Buffalo, N.Y., for anthracnose leaf blight, a fungus that winters on twig tissue, causing leaf spots, considerable defoliation and sometimes complete leaf loss. It weakens the tree and renders it more susceptible to incoming pests and diseases.

Because Buffalo’s sycamore is more than 250 years old, treatment is necessary to reduce the impact of anthracnose, and to assure the tree remains healthy for generations to come, according to Arjorbet.

Different species of anthracnose impact a variety of tree species, including oak, ash, maple, elm, hickory, walnut, birch, linden, sycamore and dogwood. Sycamore, white oak and dogwood are particularly susceptible.

The primary signs to look for are tan to red-brown lesions that extend along the veins and edges of the leaf.

Sarah Webb

About the Author:

Sarah Webb is Landscape Management's associate editor. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Wittenberg University, where she studied journalism and Spanish. Prior to her role at LM, Sarah was an intern for Cleveland Magazine and a writing tutor.

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