Fisher, SnowEx, Mich. contractor raise $10K for Komen

October 30, 2013 -  By
A pink Fisher XV2 V-plow and a pink SnowEx SP-7550 spreader were raffled off at the 2013 GIE+EXPO as a fundraiser for breast cancer awareness. Photo: Troy Clogg.

A pink Fisher XV2 V-plow and a pink SnowEx SP-7550 spreader were raffled off at the 2013 GIE+EXPO as a fundraiser for breast cancer awareness. Photo: Troy Clogg.

Bits of booths at the GIE+EXPO went pink this year for breast cancer awareness and one raised more than $10,000 in doing so.

Fisher Engineering, SnowEx and Troy Clogg Landscape Associates of Wixom, Mich., partnered to promote breast cancer awareness and raise funds for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure affiliate of Louisville, Ky., via a raffle for a pink Fisher XV2 V-plow and a pink SnowEx SP-7550 spreader. Tickets were priced at $10 and $10,021 was raised from the contest.

Two winners were drawn Friday, Oct. 25 at the show and they included Brian Crouch of Falmouth, Ky., who won the snowplow; and Michael Manley of Clermont, Fla., who won the spreader.

Each entrant had personal reasons for entering the contest. Crouch’s incentive merely was to continue supporting the Susan G. Komen organization—he recently participated in charity pet show for the cause as well. Moreover, he operates a snowplow business.

For Manley, who has nil need to plow due to the Florida climate, he entered as a means to commemorate his sister who died from breast cancer.  Since her passing, Manley has taken care of her two young children.

“He told us that just prior to the drawing he said a little prayer to his sister and thought if he happened to win maybe he could sell the spreader or plow to financially help with raising the kids,” according to a Facebook post by Fisher Plows. “He was amazed when he heard his name and came forward with his arms goose-pimpled up and hair standing on end.”

Troy Clogg, owner of Troy Clogg Landscape Associates and a snow contractor, had motive for giving a hand to the raffle as well—he offered up his truck to the drawing to model the plow and spreader on it.

In 2010, Clogg created and trademarked a product called Hot Pink Deicer as a way to raise money for local families struggling financially due to their battles with breast cancer. Each year, his company sells thousands of tons of the deicer to residential customers and commercial contractors in Michigan and donates a portion of the proceeds to local families.

“Breast cancer affects families physically, emotionally and financially,” Clogg said. “We were determined to find a way to provide a positive impact for our local community.”

Last year, he began using custom pink SnowEx spreaders as a method of promoting the breast cancer awareness message, and is now working with Douglas Dynamics to procure pink snow plows for his company.

“People come up to our crews and ask them why our spreaders are pink,” Clogg said. “This allows us to open the conversation about breast cancer awareness and let them know how they can help. Now we want to complete the package with pink plows.”

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