Project EverGreen celebrates National SnowCare for Troops Awareness week, launches Heroes Helping Heroes initiative

November 13, 2018 -  By
Logo: Snowcare For Troops

Logo: Snowcare For Troops

Project EverGreen, in partnership with Boss Snowplow, is encouraging snow management professionals to register to become a Project EverGreen SnowCare for Troops volunteer through its National SnowCare for Troops Awareness Week Nov. 11-17.

“SnowCare for Troops provides military families in need with peace of mind and lifts a significant burden from their plates,” said Cindy Code, executive director of Project EverGreen. “We’re very grateful for the commitment of our dedicated volunteers and the continued support from Boss Snowplow. The leadership they have demonstrated in support of military families goes above and beyond the call of duty.”

National SnowCare for Troops Awareness Week is intended to raise the profile of the program and spotlight the efforts of the initiative’s loyal volunteers and the military families they help, according to Project EverGreen. Throughout the week, profiles and stories will be shared via social media.

Now in its ninth year, the need for SnowCare for Troops volunteers is high, Project EverGreen said. Volunteers are matched with families within their service area.

Volunteers can register on the Project EverGreen website.

Project EverGreen also introduced its Heroes Helping Heroes campaign, an initiative in which veterans, active-duty military members or first responders register to provide complimentary lawn care, basic landscape or snow plowing services to families of deployed military personnel.

“Not only have these individuals proudly served or are currently serving our country, but they are willing to go the extra mile and help military families during their time of greatest need,” Code said.

Tyler Dixon, owner of Dixon Landscaping & Design in High Point, N.C., and a 15-year Navy veteran, is a GreenCare for Troops volunteer and knows how valuable the services can be.

“Members of the military and their families are used to handling everything on their own, and they are reluctant to reach out and ask for help. They think they can handle it,” Dixon said. “When you are deployed, your world, and your family’s world, is turned upside down. The emotional, mental and physical support is gone.”

LM Staff

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